Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

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Product Description

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

Wind/Pinball, a unique two-in-one volume, includes, on one side, Murakami’s first novel Hear the Wind Sing. When you flip the book over, you can read his second novel, Pinball, 1973. Each book has its own stunning cover.


In the spring of 1978, a young Haruki Murakami sat down at his kitchen table and began to write. The result: two remarkable short novels— Hear the Wind Sing and  Pinball, 1973—that launched the career of one of the most acclaimed authors of our time.

These powerful, at times surreal, works about two young men coming of age—the unnamed narrator and his friend the Rat—are stories of loneliness, obsession, and eroticism. They bear all the hallmarks of Murakami’s later books, and form the first two-thirds, with  A Wild Sheep Chase, of the trilogy of the Rat. 

Widely available in English for the first time ever, newly translated, and featuring a new introduction by Murakami himself,  Wind/Pinball gives us a fascinating insight into a great writer’s beginnings.

Review

“More than anyone, Haruki Murakami invented 21st-century fiction. . . . He is the novelist of our mash-up epoch. . . . Murakami’s atomic sensibility characterizes world literature." — The New York Times Book Review

“Powerful, unsettling, mature novels. . . . Murakami gives his characters'' quirks a humanizing legitimacy.” — Chicago Tribune
 
“Early Murakami isn’t Murakami-in-the-making, it’s already and entirely Murakami.” — The Guardian
 
“Both books have that unique blend of melancholy and beauty that Murakami manages so well; they are mysterious, moreish. . . . What stands out . . . is the writing, beautiful in its simplicity, and also the deadpan humour and one-liners. . . . The dialogue is sparklingly clever, drunkenly witty.” — The Independent

“A fresh, heart-warming dose of the Japanese master. . . . Signals that would become familiar in Mr Murakami’s fiction make an early appearance: characters alienated by society and afflicted by loneliness and ennui; quotidian detail that is, by turn, banal and fascinating; musical references; supernatural undertones; dark dreams and black humour.” — The Economist
 
“Murakami''s trademark postmodernist flourishes abound . . . and never fail to surprise and delight.” — O, The Oprah Magazine

“Short, darkly magical coming-of-age tales.” — Elle
 
“Indispensable. . . . There is evidence of the themes, motifs and yes, obsessions, that would come to infuse his later books.” — The Free Lance-Star (Fredericksburg)
 
“An invaluable addition to the canon.” — Toronto Star
 
“A great treat—both for Murakami enthusiasts and for the more casually interested reader. . . . A pair of early literary excursions that are never less than insightful and intelligent; brisk and diverting; unusual and transporting.” — The National (UAE)
 
“The writing and, above all, Murakami’s way of making emotionally resonant images and symbols bump around on the page, and in one’s mind, remains fresh, miraculously, more than 35 years on.” — Evening Standard

About the Author

HARUKI MURAKAMI was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into more than fifty languages, and the most recent of his many international honors is the Jerusalem Prize, whose previous recipients include J. M. Coetzee, Milan Kundera, and V. S. Naipaul.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The twins woke me up on Thursday morning. Fifteen minutes earlier than usual, but what the heck. I shaved, drank my cof­fee, and pored over the morning paper, so fresh from the press that its ink looked ready to smear my hands.

“We have a favor to ask,” said one of the twins.

“Think you can borrow a car on Sunday?” said the other.

“I guess so,” I said. “Where do you want to go?”

“The reservoir.”

“The reservoir?”

They nodded.

“What are you planning to do at the reservoir?”

“Hold a funeral.”

“Who for?”

“The switch panel, of course.”

“I see,” I said. And went back to my paper.
 
Unfortunately, a fine rain was falling Sunday morning. Not that I knew what sort of weather befitted a switch panel’s funeral. The twins never mentioned the rain, so neither did I.
I had borrowed my business partner’s sky-blue Volkswagen Beetle. “Got a girl now, huh?” he asked. “Mm,” I answered. His son had smeared milk chocolate or something all over the back­seat, leaving what looked like bloodstains from a gunfight. Not a single one of his cassette tapes was any good, so we spent the entire hour-and-a-half trip in silence. The rain grew stronger, then weaker, then stronger, then weaker again, at regular inter­vals. A yawn-inducing sort of rain. The only constant was the steady whoosh of oncoming traffic speeding by on the paved road.

One twin sat in the front passenger seat, the other in the backseat, her arms around a thermos bottle and the shopping bag that held the switch panel. Their faces were grave, appropri­ate for a funeral. I matched my mood to theirs. We maintained that solemnity even when we stopped to eat roasted corn. All that broke the silence was the sound of kernels popping off the cob. We gnawed the cobs bare, tossed them away, and resumed our drive.

The area turned out to be populated by hordes of dogs, who milled around in the rain like a school of yellowtail in an aquarium. As a result, I spent a lot of time leaning on the horn. The dogs showed no interest whatsoever in either the rain or our car. In fact, they looked downright pissed off by my honk­ing, although they scampered out of the way. It was impos­sible, of course, for them to avoid the rain. They were all soaked right down to their butt holes—some resembled the otter in Balzac’s story, others reminded me of meditating Buddhist priests.

One of the twins inserted a cigarette between my lips and lit it. Then she placed her little hand on the inner thigh of my cot­ton trousers and moved it up and down a few times. It seemed less a caress than an attempt to verify something.

The rain looked as if it would continue forever. October rains are like that—they just go on and on until every last thing is soaked. The ground was a swamp. It was a chilly, unforgiving world: the trees, the highway, the fields, the cars, the houses, and the dogs, all were drenched.

We climbed a stretch of mountain road, drove through a thick stand of trees, and there was the reservoir. Because of the rain there wasn’t a soul around. Raindrops rippled the water’s surface as far as the eye could see. The sight of the reservoir in the rain moved me in a way I hadn’t expected. We pulled up next to the water and sat there in the car, drinking coffee from the thermos and munching the cookies the twins had bought. There were three kinds—buttercream, coffee cream, and maple—that we divided up into equal groups to give everyone a fair share.
All the while the rain continued to fall on the reservoir. It made very little noise. About as much as if you dropped shred­ded newspaper on a thick carpet. The kind of rain you find in a Claude Lelouch film.

We ate the cookies, drank two cups of coffee each, and brushed the crumbs off our laps at exactly the same moment. No one spoke.

“Shall we?” one of the twins said at last.

The other nodded.

I put out my cigarette.

Leaving our umbrellas behind, we picked up the switch panel and marched to the end of the dead-end bridge that jutted out into the water. The reservoir had been created by damming a river: its banks followed an unnatural curve, the water lapping halfway up the mountainside. The color of the water suggested an eerie depth. Falling drops made fine ripples on the surface.
One of the twins took the switch panel from the paper bag and handed it to me. In the rain it looked even more pathetic than usual.

“Now say a prayer,” one of the twins said.

“A prayer?” I cried in surprise.

“It’s a funeral. There’s got to be a prayer.”

“But I’m not ready,” I said. “I don’t know any prayers by heart.”

“Any old prayer is all right,” one said.

“It’s just a formality,” added the other.

I stood there, soaked from head to toenails, searching for something appropriate to say. The twins’ eyes traveled back and forth between the switch panel and me. They were obvi­ously worried.

“The obligation of philosophy,” I began, quoting Kant, “is to dispel all illusions borne of misunderstanding . . . Rest in peace, ye switch panel, at the bottom of this reservoir.”

“Now throw it in.”

“Huh?”

“The switch panel!”

I drew my right arm all the way back and hurled the switch panel at a forty-five-degree angle into the air as hard as I could. It described a perfect arc as it flew through the rain, landing with a splash on the water’s surface. The ripples spread slowly until they reached our feet.

“What a beautiful prayer!”

“Did you make it up yourself?”

“You bet,” I said.

The three of us huddled together like dripping dogs, looking out over the reservoir.

“How deep is it?” one asked.

“Really, really deep,” I answered.

“Do you think there are fish?” asked the other.

“Ponds always have fish.”

Seen from a distance, the three of us must have looked like an elegant memorial.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

A
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A little odd but a good read
Reviewed in the United States on February 6, 2020
This arrived within two days as promised in pristine condition but I wish they would''ve wrapped it along with the other books I had purchased to protect them from the elements. The weather has been horrid where I live and sometimes the postman will just sit our parcels... See more
This arrived within two days as promised in pristine condition but I wish they would''ve wrapped it along with the other books I had purchased to protect them from the elements. The weather has been horrid where I live and sometimes the postman will just sit our parcels where ever and then the contents inside get destroyed. The first part was very good I enjoyed it but the second part I had a little trouble keeping up with sometimes. It had some odd parts but so does every other Murakami book. I enjoyed this read and I loved even more that I didn''t have to go searching for two separate books! Saved me time and money in the end! Looking forward to the next read!
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D'vo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Murakami read it all for maximum insight
Reviewed in the United States on May 12, 2020
Wind / Pinball is where it all starts. the musings of Murakami as told through a twenty something year old narrator. exploring his place in an ever changing world. asking all sorts of great questions and postulating some answers. not as " strange" as later writings but just... See more
Wind / Pinball is where it all starts. the musings of Murakami as told through a twenty something year old narrator. exploring his place in an ever changing world. asking all sorts of great questions and postulating some answers. not as " strange" as later writings but just as thought provoking for me.
prelude to "A Wild Sheep Chase" and "Dance Dance Dance"
all the stories work well as individual narrative. or read together.
took me about five days to read them all, very delightful reading.
One person found this helpful
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DC CC
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worth it but hard copy cheaper
Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2019
I don’t like that the electronic version costs more. But regarding the actual content of the writing... I’m trying to read all of Murakami in order this year. I finished Wind and am halfway through Pinball. I really enjoyed Wind even though it’s not supposed to be his... See more
I don’t like that the electronic version costs more. But regarding the actual content of the writing...
I’m trying to read all of Murakami in order this year. I finished Wind and am halfway through Pinball. I really enjoyed Wind even though it’s not supposed to be his best (but hey it was his first). I’m impressed and somewhat captivated with the way he captured this aspect of being 18-24ish. It’s a bit hard to put into words I guess, but despite being an American who spent my early 20s in America a few decades after Murakami spent his in Japan, I felt he captured this aspect of growing up that while I won’t say is universal, was something I felt connected to and related to when reading. So far I’m enjoying Pinball. Will update when I finish.
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Nathan C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Origins of the Rat
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2021
Toward the end of my Murikami journey, I decided to start at the beginning of his writing career. Having read his Rat trilogy out of order, it was really fun to see the origin of these characters and how they set the stage for his wonderfully whimsical style. These stories... See more
Toward the end of my Murikami journey, I decided to start at the beginning of his writing career. Having read his Rat trilogy out of order, it was really fun to see the origin of these characters and how they set the stage for his wonderfully whimsical style. These stories are odd, a bit meandering, but overall fun starting point for what would become one of my favorite authors/writing styles.

Essential Murakami reading? Maybe not. But fans of Dance Dance Dance and A Wild Sheep Chase owe it to themselves to find out what harkened both at the beginning of the author’s career, and the origin of the Rat and the unnamed narrator.

Ps. No ear fetishes or otherwise to speak of. Must be a later development.
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Derek J. Vasconi
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good read, but not an essential one, by my favorite author
Reviewed in the United States on September 20, 2015
So Murakami is my favorite author of all time. I''ve literally read every single thing that''s available in the English language by him. 1Q84 is my all time favorite book too. I can''t even begin to explain how excited and happy I was to hear that his first two works would... See more
So Murakami is my favorite author of all time. I''ve literally read every single thing that''s available in the English language by him. 1Q84 is my all time favorite book too. I can''t even begin to explain how excited and happy I was to hear that his first two works would finally be released in the English language. But then I got the book and read it.
First off, let me say that the book cover design and the Apollo typeface is lovely. Knopf knows how to put out great looking books, that''s for sure. The interior had a ton of pauses and stops in both stories (this book is broken into two narratives), and that got to be somewhat distracting by the 10th page of the book. By the end I was pulling my hair out in frustration because I started to feel like I was reading random diary entries than two coherent stories. So that wasn''t so good.
Then there''s the story content for both narratives. I would argue that the second story had me slightly more interested in what was going on, being that the narrator is living with a set of twins. I found it rather amusing to imagine in my head, and thankfully, in true Murakami fashion, it''s easy to imagine because he''s so perfect with all the mundane details of everyday life.
Aside from some rather extraneous descriptions in sections of each narrative, there were glimmers of a story here and there in both narratives. And a few memorable characters as well, besides the twins. But both stories just kind of went nowhere. I didn''t feel I gained anything at all from reading them, which kind of is disappointing because when I finished 1Q84, I had tears in my eyes. I was so deeply moved by that story. I guess I can''t be too hard on Murakami though... this WAS his first two attempts at writing, but still... I just had hoped for even more of a basic story, and instead I got diary entries pretending to be stories.
I would say if you are a Murakami fan, get this book and add it to your collection of his works. If you are interested in reading Murakami but never have, avoid this book like the plague. Start with Hard-Boiled Wonderland, or 1Q84 if you feel like tackling a Bible-sized novel. Am I glad I read this? Sure, but I actually enjoyed the preface more than anything else, which is where Murakami talks about his introduction to writing and his inspiration for wanting to write in the first place. That was ten times more fascinating and interesting than anything else in the book, especially given the fact that we may never hear or see Murakami in real life talk about these things because he seemingly doesn''t know what a book signing event is, or maybe he does book signings and speaking only in Japan? Who knows. But anytime we get some autobiographical discussion by Murakami, it''s always brilliant and heart-warming.
A good read, but not an essential one, by my favorite author of all time.
20 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Two Beautiful Love (Lost) Stories
Reviewed in the United States on April 23, 2017
The two novels in this book are early works for Haruki Murakami, and while some sense of youth and angst comes across, the amazing writing keeps the reader spellbound to reading between the lines. Both short novels are filled with yearning and love lost, as well as the... See more
The two novels in this book are early works for Haruki Murakami, and while some sense of youth and angst comes across, the amazing writing keeps the reader spellbound to reading between the lines. Both short novels are filled with yearning and love lost, as well as the wisdom that may be gained and the questions that remain. This entire book is a pleasure to read, and the preface by the author about his own process and path is also particularly poignant. As with most things Murakami, I highly recommend this book.
2 people found this helpful
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Geo Wizard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Melancholy dream
Reviewed in the United States on October 13, 2015
This book is captivating, like so many (well, all) of Murakami''s books. It''s melancholic tone and narrative featuring ordinary people undergoing not-so-ordinary experiences makes a person think and ruminate on the coincides and connections in life. The little things we... See more
This book is captivating, like so many (well, all) of Murakami''s books. It''s melancholic tone and narrative featuring ordinary people undergoing not-so-ordinary experiences makes a person think and ruminate on the coincides and connections in life. The little things we wouldn''t normally think once (let alone twice) about take on an altogether different importance in Murakami''s works.

This is a collection of two books - each about the length of a short novel. Both books feature an unnamed narrator and the Rat. Both young men going through inner turmoil brought about by a grander sense of ennui. There isn''t a grand sense of resolution - things just happen to change and each young man moves on in his own way.
3 people found this helpful
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ChuckS
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Murakami''s First Book is One of His Best
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2016
I am already one of Murakami''s most avid readers who looks forward to each of his books that I read. These two books which were his first were as good as his latest. They are must reads. If you have not read any Murakami''s books, read this book first and get hooked.... See more
I am already one of Murakami''s most avid readers who looks forward to each of his books that I read. These two books which were his first were as good as his latest. They are must reads. If you have not read any Murakami''s books, read this book first and get hooked. Murakami''s ability to make you bond with his character whose life is often surreal is magical. His books are a must read.
5 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

P. McCLEAN
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The birthplace of Murakami''s later works
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 25, 2016
Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball are English translations of Haruki Murakami’s first two novels which were published together in a one volume edition in 2015. In a forward to this volume the author gives an overview of how he started writing. I found this very interesting and...See more
Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball are English translations of Haruki Murakami’s first two novels which were published together in a one volume edition in 2015. In a forward to this volume the author gives an overview of how he started writing. I found this very interesting and could relate some of his experiences to similar ones of my own, though mine were not related to writing fiction. One practice Murakami described which I thought a fascinating idea was his writing a first draft in English, a language foreign to him, and then translating it into his native Japanese. His logic for doing this was that he would be writing with a limited vocabulary so that when he translated his words back into Japanese the resultant text would be free of any extraneous detours or embellishments that one might be prone to include when writing in one’s own language. He claimed this practice helped him develop his precise style of writing. These two books work well together with Pinball being a sequel to Hear the Wind Sing. Taking the two books as one entity the common theme is growing up, moving on, and the temporary nature of our world, the relationships, places and situations. There are two main characters who spend much time together drinking and smoking. One heads off to college and the other stays in the home town. The novels follow the life, thoughts, feelings and experiences of both. I found the way characters in the story related to one another quite emotionless in many cases. There was an almost stoic, if not totally unemotional, acceptance of change and a reluctance, or should I say, no tendency, to become close to people, even people with whom one is spending a lot of time, even in very intimate circumstances. I find this different from my own environment, but perhaps it is a trait found in societies with a greater population density and level of mobility than one finds where I live. These early works of Murakami’s contain many of the topics, themes and attributes found in his later stories. To name just a few one finds, wells, cats, and Japanese everyday life. The only straying into the surreal that I can recall from these two books was a reference to the perception one character had, while a passenger in a car, of the three dimensional world fading into a two dimensional world and back again. This is an illusion I have experienced myself and I believe is more to do with one’s level of tiredness rather than any dimensional shift. I enjoyed reading these books and would recommend them to other Murakami fans, not that such a recommendation is necessary. Would I recommend them to someone who is not familiar with this author’s works? I don’t know. I like his style and his writing carries me along at a steady pace and I can relate to his digressions and detours while getting the overall sense of his message. The books are short so do not require much time commitment, but not a lot happens in them and someone new to Murakami may not be encouraged to read more of his novels on the basis of reading these two. Having said that, Hear the Wind Sing, won Murakami his first writing competition and it was his winning this competition that spurred him on to continue writing. For that, I am glad he won.
3 people found this helpful
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Peter Lee
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For fans and completists only
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 3, 2015
If you''re a Murakami completist this is an absolute must. In the early 1970s Murakami released these two short novels in Japan, but they didn''t see a wider release. Here they''re combined into a single volume, "Hear The Wind Sing" on one side, and "Pinball,...See more
If you''re a Murakami completist this is an absolute must. In the early 1970s Murakami released these two short novels in Japan, but they didn''t see a wider release. Here they''re combined into a single volume, "Hear The Wind Sing" on one side, and "Pinball, 1973" on the other. Each is a mere 160 or so pages long, and they''re quick reads, but are they any good? I''ve owned a copy of "Hear The Wind Sing" for many years, a tiny paperback published by the Kodansha English Library, and when I first read it I wasn''t that impressed. It was clearly a very early work by Murakami, and there didn''t seem to be much in the way of a plot. The same was true of "Pinball, 1973", a copy of which came into my hands some time later, but both feature the character known as The Rat, who also appears in "A Wild Sheep Chase". Reading the books again now in this hardback edition they''re still not great, and if you''re new to Murakami I urge you to start elsewhere. If you''re a collector of the man''s work you''ll want a copy of this on your shelf for completeness sake, plus the covers are nice, but as stories they''re not really very good at all in my opinion, and far from his best work.
7 people found this helpful
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Aiden Power
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Forever Floating on the Wind
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 10, 2017
Within Murakami''s first foray into our minds ''we hear the wind sing'' the oft heard existential ballad of life''s journey from cocooned childhood to the stark reality of adulthood. For his first novel he provides a template for his future writing. He is an author that you...See more
Within Murakami''s first foray into our minds ''we hear the wind sing'' the oft heard existential ballad of life''s journey from cocooned childhood to the stark reality of adulthood. For his first novel he provides a template for his future writing. He is an author that you either "get" or don''t connect with. The ultimate marmite conundrum! From the moment Norwegian Wood found me, not I it, his stories have entranced me. Like many others his words speak to me on a very personal and almost cosmic level. Some sentences or happenings echo or mirror events or thoughts I once had. And therein lies his genius. Once he finds you it will all make sense. I write this as I have finished the first part of this double edition. I have heard the wind. A pre Christmas snow is beginning to fall heavily outside. A cat in our back garden is unsure of what''s falling from the sky. Now Im ready for some pinball.
2 people found this helpful
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Shantiq
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a sort of Elvis Presleying paint-roller applied to everything...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 24, 2017
Like Philippe Djian did after him; a writer of American tales written outside of America set in a different country like a 53rd or 54th state as yet unnamed. This is not the full Murakami yet but all the trademark moves are already present: oneiric people and places; jumps...See more
Like Philippe Djian did after him; a writer of American tales written outside of America set in a different country like a 53rd or 54th state as yet unnamed. This is not the full Murakami yet but all the trademark moves are already present: oneiric people and places; jumps in time; a queer relationship to the feminine; Western European and American food totally obliterating any idea one might be in Japan; a sort of Elvis Presleying paint-roller applied to everything... And tangentially glimpses of something Nipponese; but only spotted through the slats of the tales ... if you look intently. Not his best of course ... he did them as he felt he should; having had a satori telling he was to be a writer whilst sitting at a baseball game [recounted in foreword] ... but it is Murakami ; a fourth-dimension writer of genius like Thomas Pynchon or Roberto Bolaño So not his best is still better than most .. all fans a must ... others ... go on then
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Atul Kumar Singh
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this before picking up the book
Reviewed in India on March 2, 2019
Mr. Haruki Murakami calls this one a ‘Kitchen Table Novel’ and rightly so. In the introduction, he mentions it as "The Birth of My Kitchen Table Fiction," which describes his journey to becoming a great writer. This is Murakami’s first ever work, and hence you would get a...See more
Mr. Haruki Murakami calls this one a ‘Kitchen Table Novel’ and rightly so. In the introduction, he mentions it as "The Birth of My Kitchen Table Fiction," which describes his journey to becoming a great writer. This is Murakami’s first ever work, and hence you would get a flavor of Murakami’s style, but you would be left wanting for more. You would also see that this work of his is not as polished since he was just beginning to become a writer. For people who are new to Murakami, they should know that this book is the First one, in a trilogy. The trilogy (which is actually called the ‘Rat Trilogy’), consists of below books in this order: #1 Wind/Pinball #2 A Wild Sheep Chase #3 Dance Dance Dance Both "Wind" (a random mess) and "Pinball, 1973" (slightly more promising) feature an unnamed protagonist, and his best friend "The Rat" (we don’t know why he’s called so), who smoke large quantities of Seven Stars cigarettes and drink beer and contemplate their love lives. No story, no narrative flow, just aimless, random thoughts on their places in the world. There’s also mention of a prominent place called J''s bar, a drinking hole in Tokyo. Only "Pinball" has anything resembling a story, but it''s just as frustrating as the first because, you can see glimpses of the Murakami we know and love, but the story abruptly ends with no resolution, just when things are finally starting to get somewhat interesting. If you are a fan of Murakami’s and are interested in finding out how he started his writing career, then this little book is for you. "Wind/Pinball" features two novels which were the very first stories that Murakami wrote in his kitchen, late in the night. The stories are somewhat quirky, incoherent and plotless, and it''s evident that they''re written by an author starting out. What I appreciated the most about this book was actually the foreword by Murakami himself, in which he - among other things - reveals how he came up with and developed his unique writing style. If you’re looking for a great story, avoid this one. However, if you’re Murakami fan, and would want to dig deeper into his first ever literary work, go ahead and pick this one. I would rate it a 3/5 only because I’m a Murakami fan, otherwise, I would have given it 1/5 or max 2/5. Cheers!
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Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale

Wind/Pinball: Hear the wholesale Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 (Two Novels) (Vintage discount International) outlet online sale